Category Archives: Nintendo Switch Featured

5 Ways to Spend Wisely During the Nintendo Switch Launch

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Kyle Roth
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Kyle Roth

Gold is the co-owner and programmer of the small indie game company GoldenCrab Studios. He has been a Nintendo faithful since the NES days and is a hobbyist writer and Let's Player. For reasons unknown, he is always behind on sleep.
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A lot of Nintendo fans are interested in the Switch, but also don’t want to bust their budgets with all the accessories and extras that will be available. While everyone’s situation will be a bit different, here are five general tips to help you figure out how to get the most out of your Switch experience without going overboard with your wallet.

Participate in the Dock Exchange
When it comes to a secondary dock, $90 is a lot to ask for. However, some Switch users will only be interested in using their console as a handheld or in tabletop mode. You might be able to buy an extra dock from one of these users in like-new condition for a much more palatable price. And if you’re one of the users who only intends to use the console portably, go ahead and sell your dock—you’ll be able to recoup some of your purchase price and help out the Switch community at the same time!

Rent Games You Aren’t Sure About
As mentioned in a previous article, GameFly will be carrying a lineup of Switch titles. If you’re interested in trying everything or experiencing a title just for a short time, you might be able to save a good chunk of change by using a rental service and cycling through what’s available. And if it turns out you like a title enough to buy your own copy, you’ll be comfortable with knowing your purchase is a good one!

nintendo switch launch

Games Now, Expansions Later
You could buy the Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild expansion pack for $20 and see a few small extras in the game right away. Or you could wait to buy the expansion and spend $20 on Snipperclips instead. Nintendo should be announcing how long you can get the extras from the expansion pack and more details on what the expansion installments will include as time goes on, so (as long as you’re watching closely) you can buy what’s readily available now and wait until the expansions are getting closer and proving themselves before going in on them.

Share Games (And Costs) With Friends
Not many players are excited about paying $50 for 1-2 Switch. A group of five people paying $10 each for 1-2 Switch and passing it around as parties and gatherings arise might be more sensible depending on your group. If you go this route, be sure you know who holds on to the copy when no one is using it and what you’ll do with it if someone moves away one day (though hopefully by the time that happens, most people involved don’t miss the money they spent when the purchase originally took place).

Alternatively, you could coordinate with friends about who wants which games the most, then lend and borrow your copies of those games so everyone can try out everything. This won’t be ideal for adventures like Breath of the Wild or Super Mario Odyssey, but it might do you good with titles like 1-2 Switch, Super Bomberman R, ARMS, and Mario Kart 8 Deluxe as they come out. Just be sure you only do this with people you trust—there are already enough stories in the world of a borrowed copy of Ocarina of Time or Banjo-Kazooie “mysteriously going missing” and being discovered in a dresser drawer afterward.

nintendo switch launch

Improvise
You should buy whichever accessories you feel like you need, but you might be able to save a little money by finding creative ways to get around them. Do you need a plastic dock to access your Switch’s USB-C port and charge it while you’re playing in tabletop mode? Or can you make do around the house by propping it up on two books, one on the left and one on the right leaving the center accessible? If you have access to the resources, you might even be able to use a 3D printer to make your own dock to keep it on (but oh please don’t buy a 3D printer just to do this!). So long as you’re careful, you might be able to experiment with a carrying bag you already own to save you the price of an official one. Because the system uses USB-C to charge, you can use any plug or car charger you already have to keep it powered wherever you take it. It’s worth thinking about what else you might be able to do to suit your needs without spending anything extra.

But you should definitely buy a screen protector for your console. Some users are going to end up with their consoles scratched or dropped, even if it isn’t their fault, and we don’t know who those users will be until it happens. If you buy a screen protector for your Switch and never see any damage on it, you’ve spent a small amount of money one time on something you didn’t need. If you don’t buy a screen protector and your console’s screen gets cracked, you’ll end up spending a lot more to get it repaired than the protector would have costed, or else you’ll have to live with a cracked screen in portable mode. Any screen protector is better than none, even a cheap or low-quality one.

Can you think of any other helpful tips to spend wisely on Switch games and extras? Let us know!

Beware of Nintendo Switch Pre-order Scams

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Kyle Roth
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Kyle Roth

Gold is the co-owner and programmer of the small indie game company GoldenCrab Studios. He has been a Nintendo faithful since the NES days and is a hobbyist writer and Let's Player. For reasons unknown, he is always behind on sleep.
Kyle Roth
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When the Wii U was launching, some people sold their pre-orders for $350, the launch price of the console. That sentence seems fine until you know what “pre-order” means. While they dressed up their auction pages to look like you were buying the console for nothing more than its list price, you were actually only buying their reservation on the console. When launch day came, you still owed the retailer $300 that your seller hadn’t paid for yet.

There’s a good chance people will try this trick again with the Switch. Be wary if you go shopping for it secondhand before launch day.

If you pre-order a console from a website, they typically won’t charge you for your order until it ships. When you pre-order from a store in person, they might have you put some money down as part of the pre-order and pay the rest later (often $5 for a game or $50 for a console). In either case, they put you on a list of customers who have reserved the product for when it releases. The trick in this kind of dirty dealing only sells you the place on the list, leaving you to pay the difference.

Furthermore, if a single customer pre-orders more than one console from the same place, the store is likely to cancel some of that customer’s pre-orders if the demand among others is popular. If you buy a reserve from someone who has done this, there’s a chance your pre-order will be canceled, which means you paid whichever price you agreed on and have nothing to show for it.

There’s nothing wrong with buying another person’s pre-order in and of itself, but make sure you know what you’re getting into and be sure to ask smart questions. Specifically ask if you’re paying for the console if you’ll need to pay the rest of its price later. Find out if your seller has made multiple pre-orders to assess your risk of your order falling through. If possible, find out if your seller is reputable or if they’ve done any scalping sales in the past.

What Makes the Nintendo Switch Easy to Port To?

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Kyle Roth
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Kyle Roth

Gold is the co-owner and programmer of the small indie game company GoldenCrab Studios. He has been a Nintendo faithful since the NES days and is a hobbyist writer and Let's Player. For reasons unknown, he is always behind on sleep.
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Even before its reveal, many developers described the Switch as being easy to program for. We’ve had a range of comments, some going as far to say it’s the easiest porting experience they’ve had, others saying it “just works” without any unwanted complications, but pretty much all of them give a feeling that developing Switch games is easier than they expected.

It can be difficult to appreciate what easy porting means if you’re not familiar with programming, and even trickier to figure out what exactly is going on that makes it easy to port for. This article will go through the technical side of things explaining why porting is normally difficult (including explaining some basic programming terms) and speculate a bit about what Nintendo might be doing to make programming for their system as painless as possible.

Why is Porting Normally a Nightmare?

At this point in time, a good game engine handles the heavy lifting when porting from one platform to another. A developer writes code using a programming language they can read, and when it’s finished or ready for testing it gets compiled or built into code the computer can read. Compiled code is definitely NOT the same as code the developer reads, but developer code can be compiled as frequently as needed as long you can take the time to do it (which takes longer for AAA projects than for smaller indie projects). A good engine might only work with specific programming languages, but then can take that same code and build it into code for a number of different platforms. Even so, developers need to worry about specific ways each one handles things.

As a simple example, I use Unity to program games on my Mac laptop, working together with a friend who uses a Windows desktop. Part of my code handles input from an Xbox 360 controller. For Windows, the A, B, X, and Y buttons are internally read as buttons numbered 0, 1, 2, and 3 respectively (computers often start counting from zero instead of one). On a Mac, those same buttons are numbered 16, 17, 18, and 19 respectively. Part of my job is making sure the code knows which system it’s running on and looks for the correct button by number in each case. (Don’t even get me started on how differently the left and right triggers work.)

Differences like that are bothersome but fairly simple—your engine will ideally allow you to write code for both versions in the same file and build the correct code depending on the system you’re on (as is my case with Unity). Where it gets really tricky is where system hardware is different.

If you’re trying to make a multi-platform game for Wii U, Playstation 4, and Windows, you know that the Wii U has 2 GB of RAM, the PS4 has 8 GB, and a Windows PC could have less than 1 GB or more than 16 GB. Here you could choose to target the smallest amount of RAM you expect to see, or you could create larger and smaller texture files so the PS4 and PC versions look better than the Wii U version.

nintendo switch ports

Even once you’re past that, the Wii U has a souped up version of an old CPU architecture while the PS4 uses a more powerful CPU based on newer architecture. Let’s say your game as written runs more smoothly on the PS4 than on the Wii U. Your options to deal with it are to look for intense parts of the code and try to rewrite them, specifically rewrite intense code bits for the Wii U (which might mean it runs fine but functions differently), or accept that the Wii U version has lag issues and release it anyway.

The farther back in the console generations you go, the more complicated it gets. If you don’t have an engine that builds for different systems for you, you’ll need to make those builds yourself. You’ll also have to hope multiple systems support the language you’re using, or you’ll be rewriting it in multiple languages, and then you’ll need to go back and edit multiple versions if a problem is discovered. What approach will you take if one system has an analog stick and another doesn’t? You might need your code to work directly with the system’s hardware, so you’ll have to understand what the specific platform you’re working on has going on under the hood.

Yeah, porting used to be an absolute monstrosity of a nightmare. It’s still a nightmare, but it’s a lot better now than it used to be.

What Might Nintendo Be Doing To Accommodate Developers?

We won’t know for certain what Nintendo is doing until more details on developing for the system have been made public knowledge. However we do know that Unity is on their list of companies working with them, and we have it confirmed that Unreal Engine 4 will be compatible with it. Both engines are capable of creating builds for multiple platforms, and this makes it easy for developers familiar with those engines to approach the system.

From what we’ve seen, switching the Switch to and from TV mode has been consistently seamless. Considering developers have talked about how easy it is to program for, it’s possible they don’t need to do anything extra to account for this. That would mean Nintendo has taken the hard part of switching back and forth on themselves so the developers have it easy, which is an admirable practice!

nintendo switch ports

It’s impressive that porting seems to be easy even though the Switch has 4 GB of RAM compared to the PS4 and Xbox One’s 8 GB. There is a trick called virtual memory which involves using hard drive space to pretend the system has more RAM than it does, but traditionally this can lead to lag spikes and slowdowns when that memory needs to be accessed. Has Nintendo made use of this or another trick to make the RAM work harder than normal, or are third parties simply working within this limit? Only time will tell.

Similarly, while we don’t know exactly what sort of processor the Switch has, we can pretty safely say it’s both simple enough and powerful enough to adapt to existing projects developers want to bring to the system.

It’s a shame that there are still a lot of unknowns that keep us from really going into detail on why Switch development is easy, but hopefully this article sheds a bit of light on what might be going on. One thing is for sure: the moment we’re able to interview someone working on it or get our hands on Switch development kits of our own, we’ll bring you whatever information we can pass along without breaking NDAs as quickly as we’re able. Stay tuned!

How Ultra Street Fighter II Can Help the Switch

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Clayton Shipman
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Clayton Shipman

I have been gaming ever since I was able to hold a NES controller. While growing up, I obsessed over games and the gaming industry so much it was scary, and as I continue to do as an adult. After spending a decade managing a video game retail store, I decided to pursue a lifelong passion of mine, video game journalism. I figured that 30 plus years of useless gaming knowledge should be put to use somehow.
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In the summer of 1994, I was deep into Super Metroid. Being 9 years old at the time, I was enthralled within Nintendo’s side-scrolling sci-fi adventure. Nothing could tear me away from it.

Until the fateful day that a neighborhood friend invited me over to his house, stating that he had just bought a new fighting game with his allowance. That game was Super Street Fighter II: The New Challengers. Before that day, I had only played past versions of Street Fighter here and there. Nothing ever substantial enough to warrant any type of thoughts about the series. After spending all day fighting against my friend, trading wins and losses back and forth, I forgot all about my space adventures with a certain bounty hunter.

I remember kids in school throughout the next semester spending countless amounts of hours debating which game was better, Mortal Kombat II or Super Street Fighter II. The vast majority somehow always ended up on Capcom’s side. There was just something about that game that drew everyone to it in a good way. Whether it was the great sounding music and sound effects, the almost pixel perfect artwork, or the finely tuned fighting mechanics. Super Street Fighter II: The New Challengers was simply fun in the purest form, packed into a small rectangular gray cartridge.

It became a game that everyone wanted. If you didn’t personally own it, you tried to talk your friend that did into letting you borrow it in exchange for your copy of Donkey Kong Country. Groups of friends would hold their own tournaments to decide who was the best fighter between them. Super Street Fighter II had a special ability to make the player feel awesome. Whether you won or lost, you always had that urge to play more. There was simply a good feeling with sitting in front of the TV with a friend while trying to master moves and combos, along with finding the character that you clicked with the most. You never turned down an invitation to play Super Street Fighter II in the early 90s.

ultra street fighter ii

Over 20 years have passed since the release of Super Street Fighter II on the Super Nintendo. Capcom is going to try and capture all the same feelings as before, this time on the Nintendo Switch with Ultra Street Fighter II: The Final Challengers. This new version of Street Fighter II will feature tweaked gameplay balancing, the choice between playing with the original pixel art or a new HD graphical setting, and two new characters, Evil Ryu and Violent Ken. There will be all of your typical game modes, Versus, Arcade, etc. Along with an added Group Battle, where you and a buddy can take on the CPU together. Then to round it all out, fully featured online gameplay, as detailed here by NSN’s own, Anthony Talcott.

Ultra Street Fighter II will truly shine on the Switch when it’s in the Nintendo-named “Share the Joy” mode. When you split apart the Joy-Con controller, giving you the ability to play with someone else locally, whether it be at home on a TV or on the go in portable mode. Fighting games have lost a certain sense of camaraderie over the past generation or so. Instead of actively sitting next to someone on a couch, trading hadoukens and sonic booms back and forth, there’s been a heavy influence of strictly fighting against random people over the Internet. Not to say that playing online against someone is bad, because it’s actually quite the opposite. There’s just a different feeling when playing a fighting game with a good friend while sitting in the same room.

The Nintendo Switch has the structure to bring that camaraderie feeling back in full force and Ultra Street Fighter II can help usher in that movement. From Street Fighter to Bomberman, the Nintendo Switch will shine with its Share the Joy mode.

Silver Linings of Nintendo Switch Presentation

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Kyle Roth
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Kyle Roth

Gold is the co-owner and programmer of the small indie game company GoldenCrab Studios. He has been a Nintendo faithful since the NES days and is a hobbyist writer and Let's Player. For reasons unknown, he is always behind on sleep.
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The Nintendo Switch presentation, along with the interviews, updates, and hands-on demonstrations that followed it, gave us plenty of things to be excited about. It also came with a few reveals that left its viewers with some strong negative feelings.

The more time that goes on, however, the more some of these ideas don’t seem as bad or off-putting as they seemed at first. This article will go over some details and reveals that are generally looked down on and go over some of the ways they might fit the phrase, “That’s actually not as bad of an idea as it looks.”

arms nintendo switch

Arms

Nintendo came out swinging with Arms early in their presentation, and right away it looked like trouble. They talked about it as a game that would require more quick thinking and intense decision making, but showed it in a way reminiscent to the Wii as if it was simply a demo of their fancy new motion controls. Afterward though, we quickly learned that the game can be played with a standard controller setup and motion controls are simply an option.

On top of that, those who have tried Arms hands-on have reported that it is a lot more strategic than the presentation made it look. The game has a lot of Rock-Paper-Scissors elements to it. For instance, blocking works well against a standard punch, but a grab overcomes a block, and punching works as a very effective counter to a grab. Factor in choosing equipment which also follows Rock-Paper-Scissors rules and tactics to throw off your opponent and anticipate their actions, and you have the makings of a game with a high skill ceiling. Only time will tell if it will be intense by standards of fighting game veterans, but it looks strong enough to stand on its own.

Now all they have to do is add a Little Mac skin for Spring Man and this writer will be sold on it.

1-2 switch

1-2-Switch

1-2-Switch was another case that brought on some Wii worries, and it felt especially like a sting when it was revealed that not only was it NOT a pack-in title, but has a $50 price tag. In this case, it’s important to keep perspective on what this title means for the system and its launch. Nintendo would love to relive the days that the Wii took the casual market by storm, but no one wants that to come at the cost of console power or more hardcore games.

What’s important to remember is that if Nintendo successfully appeals to the casual market, it means more console sales. When a lot of people own a console, it attracts third parties to develop for it, which means more of the games the rest of us all want. Nintendo also showed no shortage of games meant to appeal to the hardcore crowd, so there’s no risk of being left out in the cold for a title like this.

That just leaves the case of people who might be interested in trying the game, but aren’t willing to pay full price. This is especially tricky if you only expect to get a few hours of use out of it or only plan to play it at parties, but there is a way out here. Consider chipping in with a group of friends for a single copy that you will pass around as needed for gatherings and events. If you can’t find enough people willing to pay part of the price, there’s a good chance there are other games on the console that will interest you more anyway.

no friend codes

The Joy-Cons

No one is really happy with the price of extra Joy-Cons, and features like HD rumble might feel like a waste that we need to pay the extra money for even if we aren’t using them. We can’t really make a call about this until we try it in person—maybe it will be amazing, maybe it will go mostly unused.

That said, some fans might be interested in the possibilities this could bring to VR gameplay. While they have no plans for VR support at this time, Nintendo did reserve a few patents for it in the future just in case. The future could hold a day where you look at someone through your VR headset and watch and feel as they pour water into your glass. Or it could just be guessing how many marbles are in a cup in a Mario Party mini-game, we’ll just have to wait and see.

When Nintendo originally announced motion controls for the Wii, they made it sound a lot better than the capabilities it launched with. Later they added Wii Motion Plus, which made it feel more like what they promised in the beginning. By now it should be very advanced, meaning any future games putting motion controls to use should be better than some of the lackluster experiences the Wii ended up with. And if Arms, which looks like it was made to show off new motion capabilities, doesn’t require motion controls, then hopefully it will always be an option rather than a requirement going forward.

The design of the Joy-Cons themselves also offers a lot of possibilities. Arms has you hold them at a different angle than normal so that your index fingers have access to the SL and SR buttons, which are used as shoulder buttons if you hold it sideways. That opens up some significant possibilities to any developers who can figure out how you might use them when holding it that way.

switch ui

Storage

32 GB of built-in storage is not much. If you plan to buy physical copies of your games, it is more than it sounds like with only DLC taking up significant space. If you’re looking to download your games or use a lot of DLC, the system’s compatibility with micro SD cards is a saving grace. Even if it means ending up paying more, you’re able to choose for yourself what your best options for storage are.

Online Service

This is probably one of the biggest points of contention of what was revealed. Nintendo is going to start charging for their online service, and we know they’ll be using a phone app for scheduling matches and calls. At the very least, a pay-for service means they’re listening to consumer opinions and improving their network to meet the demand.

This is the sort of situation where PR tells employees what they can and can’t say to avoid misleading people’s expectations. We know that Nintendo’s service will work through a phone app, but we don’t know whether or not it will work through the console yet. We need to wait for confirmation on that, so all we can analyze for now is what we know. (But since it’s popular to make jokes about using your phone to talk to people, allow me to make the joke that I haven’t seen anyone use a phone to actually call someone else in years.)

While most people don’t want a phone app solely in charge of online functionality, but having a companion app is a great idea. If you want to check if your friends are planning a game or are in a match, you can easily check it on your phone instead of needing to get your whole console out. It also shows that there’s a possibility of other Switch games having companion apps of their own.

This might sound ridiculous, but having a grip for the Joy-Cons with a clip for your phone so you can handle voice chat easily while you play is possible. If the phone is the only way to voice chat, this is a feasible idea. If chat is routed entirely through the phone, it takes some strain off the console. However, voice chat existed on the PS2 (and on the Wii for that matter), so this upside may be negligible.

nintendo switch clock speeds

Battery

The console’s battery life undocked is estimated at 2.5 to 6 hours, averaging 3 hours for a game like Zelda: Breath of the Wild. This new console has the same battery life as the gamepad controller of its predecessor. That’s a pretty impressive leap by itself.

The fact that the console uses USB-C means that charging the battery is easy—not just in the sense of fast charging, but in terms of how easy it is to find a compatible charge cable when you’re out and about. If you’re playing in a car or on a plane, there’s a good chance you can plug it in while you’re there, and not many other situations will have you going two hours without being able to charge.

However, if you are someone who is active enough that the battery life isn’t enough, another option is to use an external charger like cell phones can use. If you go this route, it will be important to pay attention to the mAh of the charger (effectively its capacity). The Switch battery is estimated around 4000 mAh, so keep that number in mind when you’re shopping. Also bear in mind that this may not be a 1-to-1 ratio—a 20,000 mAh charger may not necessarily keep your console charged for 15 hours.

fire emblem nintendo switch

Fire Emblem Warriors

Let’s end this series of silver linings looking at something no one was upset about to begin with. The more you think about using the Fire Emblem setting in a Dynasty Warriors style, the more sense it makes. While the two series have very different play styles, the goals they give the player fit together very nicely. In Fire Emblem games, your goals are often to reach a point at the other side of the map, defeat a boss, defeat several key enemies, survive until a time limit is reached, or protect an important NPC. In Fire Emblem Warriors, you’ll be doing the same things, but with a bigger focus on pumping adrenaline instead of planning out your next moves.

Plus, Fire Emblem has a nice sound track that has a chance to be remixed!

I hope you enjoyed reading through this recap on the Nintendo Switch presentation. If you would like to see a full list of games headed to the Nintendo Switch, you can find a full list HERE.

A new look at the Nintendo Switch UI

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Daniel Clifft
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Daniel Clifft

Hello there, just your average video game enthusiast/writer/guy with too many opinions. I here to make sure this ship doesn’t go down without a fight. This is my first time doing a big journalist project and I’m super excited to start making content for Nintendo Switch Network.
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On the presentation on the Nintendo Switch, they showed off quite a few things and answered quite a few questions we had, but one thing that we only got a quick glace was the UI of the system, and it really didn’t tell us much.

Then during the Treehouse live presentation the day after, during the Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild demo, we got to see a live version of the Operating System that gave us a quick glace at what to expect, but in the end they quickly moved onto the game and left us to speculate.

Under these conditions, the only expected future information about the UI of the Nintendo Switch would come out when the Nintendo Switch comes out, but unexpectedly we got quite a treat. From the developers of Cave Story, Nicalis, tweeted out a picture of the UI, but was quickly deleted, of course not before the someone, “tsarkees” from twitter got a mirrored and saved for the internet to look at, and oh boy is it something to look at.

This tells us quite a few things, for one, that the UI can be customized in some degree and in fact might even have a night mode if you want to base this off of possible different color schemes. This also seems to point to the fact that you can have multiple accounts as well as customization account photos. Cave Story as well as 1001 Spikes is shown, which basically confirms the titles for the Switch, but as you can tell, there seems to be another title shown that you can’t really see since it is cut off, but of course, the internet had an answer for it.

One of the leading theories as to why this post was taken down was because on the far right it shows an unconfirmed title that probably isn’t done considering the transparent background of the art.

As you can see from this image, the game seems to be the 2011 indie game Hydra Castle Labyrinth, which is still unconfirmed. Keep in mind, all the games shown except for The Binding of Issac has not been confirmed by the developer, but at this point it’s hard to not look at this without certainty.

We will keep you updated on this if more news comes out about the UI or games. If you want to see a full list of games check HERE.

New Writer Introduction and Giveaway Details!

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Daniel Clifft
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Daniel Clifft

Hello there, just your average video game enthusiast/writer/guy with too many opinions. I here to make sure this ship doesn’t go down without a fight. This is my first time doing a big journalist project and I’m super excited to start making content for Nintendo Switch Network.
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Hello there, my name is Daniel Clifft, and I am the new writer and organizer for the Nintendo Switch Network. There really isn’t much else to know about me other than the fact that I love video games and Nintendo. I also have a passion for writing and creating content for people to enjoy. This will be the first big project/team that I will be a part of, so I am super excited to start making content for all of you.

Apart from that I might as well give an update to the status of the 2nd issue and other related content. Over the next couple of weeks, we will be brainstorming ideas to start putting together the theme, different sections and talking points for the upcoming issue. In fact, we have already started working on making content to bring to you in February.

Right now, if you go to Twitter we are running a giveaway for a 11×14 poster with the 1st issues cover art on it. To qualify for it you must follow the Nintendo Switch Network official Twitter account, @NinSwitchNet and follow the artist responsible for the artwork at the following handle, @EternaLegend  EL. Along with that you must also retweet the tweet containing the giveaway and your all set. The winner for this giveaway will be announced on Thursday, January 19th, the best of luck to all of you.

As for the other on going giveaways from our 1st issue, we will be selecting the winner for the Patreon users for the $10 Nintendo eShop card sometime this week.

We at Nintendo Switch Network are working hard to bring you the best news in Nintendo Switch and Nintendo related content and we strive to bring you a unique experience to your mailbox and media devices. As of now we have broken the 1k mark for Twitter followers which is incredible, we are amazed at the support we have gotten from the 1st issue and this makes us strive to bring you even better content each issue.

Over the next month, we will be releasing more information about the upcoming issue, including some of the content as well as the its theme. Please make sure to follow us on twitter to receive updates on this, as soon as it is released.

We thank you for your time, and hope you all have a good night. This is Daniel Clifft, signing off.

The FIRST Nintendo Switch Magazine

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Austin H.
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Austin H.

Austin enjoys long walks on the beach with his Nintendo Switch while enjoying the reflection of the sunset. Well... the Nintendo Switch has not been released yet, so he just dreams about that at night. Austin is known to talk about himself in third person and refers to himself as Clint Eastwood at times.
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Our whole team has been designing this Nintendo Switch Magazine over the last few months. Magazines may not be the most popular form of news, but they sure look amazing.

Nothing will look better next to your Nintendo Switch than a whole stack of Nintendo Switch themed magazines.  Plus, this gives us a way to bring the Nintendo Switch community together. This includes bringing the developers into the community and allowing them to interact with the consumers who enjoy playing their games.

The Nintendo Switch Network Magazine will start at approximately $10.99 each issue for the print version. The digital version will be included for free, or you can buy the digital version separate for $1.99. Patrons who pay $1.99 per magazine will also receive early access to the digital version.

Our magazines will feature EXCLUSIVE content that can’t be found anywhere else. We won’t even post this exclusive content on our website. We have already set up exclusive interviews with studios developing games for the Nintendo Switch, and we will continue to include those in every issue we release. On top of exclusive content, we will be including giveaways in each issue of the Nintendo Switch Magazine. These giveaways are exclusive to our Magazine readers in order to thank you all for the massive support. Whether you prefer digital or physical magazines, we will have both available for purchase. The digital version of our magazine will also be available via mobile devices which makes it easy to access.

We are currently planning on publishing issues bi-monthly. Our goal is to publish the issues digitally and physically on the first week of every other month. Patrons will get EXCLUSIVE access of our magazine digitally up to a week before everyone has access to view it. Also, you will only be charged PER magazine we release which will be every other month until we hit our $500 goal. Our first issue is set to release by the first week in January if everything goes well!

We need your help!

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Top 3 Features I want on the Nintendo Switch

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Austin H.
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Austin H.

Austin enjoys long walks on the beach with his Nintendo Switch while enjoying the reflection of the sunset. Well... the Nintendo Switch has not been released yet, so he just dreams about that at night. Austin is known to talk about himself in third person and refers to himself as Clint Eastwood at times.
Austin H.
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There has been a lot of talk about the Nintendo Switch recently in regards to rumored features. While we still do not have confirmation for many of these rumors, I would like to talk about the top 3 features the Nintendo Switch NEEDS to have. In no particular order here is my top 3

Smooth Online Capabilities:

Let’s face it, Nintendo has slacked over the years when it comes to online features for their consoles. The Nintendo Switch HAS to be nearly on par with the PS4 and Xbox One when it comes to the online experience. This generation of gaming relies heavily on multiplayer and playing with friends, and Nintendo needs to keep this in mind.

This brings up the question on whether or not people would be willing to pay for a Nintendo online subscription similar to the yearly Xbox live fees. I feel like this would be a no-brainer, YES. Xbox and PlayStation have proven gamers will happily pay a yearly subscription fee to play online. The Nintendo Switch needs to bridge the gap between the WiiU and the current gen systems. A smooth party chat/messaging system is a must. This is especially true if Nintendo plans to create a competitive eSports community.

Achievements:

Hi, my name is Austin and I am addicted to achievements. The first step on the road to recovery is to acknowledge that I have a problem. On a serious note, bring on the achievements Nintendo! Nintendo is literally the only company who has yet to integrate an achievement system on their gaming devices. I personally get so much more out of games I play when I have achievements to work towards.

It would also be interesting to have some sort of rewards system tied to these achievements, although that may be way too much to ask for at this point. I would be glad to just have some sort of achievement system.

Multi-tasking and a BEAUTIFUL user interface:

The Nintendo Switch needs to be able to SWITCH between apps/games and the UI. The 3DS does not have any multi-tasking whatsoever, but the PlayStation Vita on the other hand has shown the ability to multi-task rather well. On the topic of multi-tasking, I am also hoping to see a variety of streaming apps available on the Nintendo Switch. I currently own the Xbox One and it doubles as a gaming system and smart TV due to all the apps available. The Nintendo Switch needs to have these in order to compete with the Xbox One and PS4.

The user interface is also important to me. I specifically would like to have the ability to customize the main home screen with wallpapers. Nintendo handhelds have yet to have much of any customization whatsoever, and this hybrid system should be the first to do so. Nintendo needs to go big or go home at this point. Everything revealed so far seems to be very promising, and I am beyond hyped for the Nintendo Switch.  I’m just hoping Nintendo does everything they can in order to recover from the path they took with the WiiU. What features would you like to see on the Nintendo Switch? If you haven’t heard yet, GameCube Virtual console is rumored to be coming to the Nintendo Switch.

Nintendo Switch Ports are Not a Bad Thing

nintendo switch ports
Austin H.
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Austin H.

Austin enjoys long walks on the beach with his Nintendo Switch while enjoying the reflection of the sunset. Well... the Nintendo Switch has not been released yet, so he just dreams about that at night. Austin is known to talk about himself in third person and refers to himself as Clint Eastwood at times.
Austin H.
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It seems like everyday we are getting rumors of new games which will be coming to the Nintendo Switch. A vast majority of these games seem to be ports though. Will having too many Nintendo Switch Ports  have a negative effect on the system? Here’s why I think Nintendo Switch ports will be a great thing for the Switch.

So while we have not many confirmed titles coming to the Nintendo Switch, we do currently have 38 games rumored to be in development. You can read through the full list of titles HERE. Of these 38 games, more than half of them are considered to be “ports”. I personally think ports are great and they help fill in titles, especially, for new systems. Some gamers though are complaining about the lack of unique titles in the lineup for the Nintendo Switch. So this brings up the question, is there such thing as too many ports? The answer to that question is yes.

If, the Nintendo Switch only received ports of games and lacked any unique titles there would be very little incentive to buy the console. There needs to be a good port to new title ratio. I personally believe ports and “remasters” are different though. Rumors are going around that the Mario Kart and Splatoon teased in the official launch trailer will both be “remasters”. These games will supposedly both contain DLC from the previous release as well as some additional content unique to the Nintendo Switch version.

nintendo switch ports

While technically this sounds a lot like a port, this is a smart way for companies to give gamers new content without releasing a whole new game which only really adds a new feature or two. I personally would rather play a remastered version of Mario Kart than a whole new version which adds nothing new. I mean who really wants to buy a new Call of Duty every year for a new feature or two? When a new game is released it should be NEW. New games should add significant changes.

So could too many Nintendo Switch ports be a bad thing? Possibly, but with many of these titles rumored to be remasters, Nintendo may be on the right track. If a game isn’t broke, there is no need to fix it. Plus we have also been teased with a variety of unique games including: New 3D Mario, Dragon Quest XI, Entertainment HERO, Zelda: BOTW, and several others. Unique IP’s will sell the Nintendo Switch, but remasters and ports will keep consumers playing the system in-between releases. The Nintendo Switch has a bright future ahead if it can execute a successful launch lineup.

What do you think about the vast amount of rumored ports coming to the Nintendo Switch? Do you think remasters are worth buying or would you prefer a complete new game? Let us know your thoughts.